Scoliosis

What is Scoliosis?

Scoliosis affects about 5-7 million people in the U.S., scoliosis is a lateral curvature of more than 10 degrees in the spine. A person with scoliosis will have a C- or S-shaped curve in their spine. It can appear at any age, but it often presents from the age of 10 to 12 years, or during the teens, but infants can sometimes have symptoms. The reasons for the change in shape are not usually known, but some cases are linked to cerebral palsymuscular dystrophy, spina bifida, or a birth defect.

A structural curve is permanent, and may be due to another condition. A nonstructural curve is temporary and it is likely to disappear with time. A very small number of patients with scoliosis may require surgery. Complications of scoliosis include chronic pain, respiratory deficiencies, and decreased exercise capacity.

 

What are the Symptoms of Scoliosis?

The most common form of scoliosis appears in adolescence. It is known as adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. It can affect children from the age of 10 years.

Idiopathic means that there is no known cause. Symptoms can include:

  • The head is slightly off center
  • The ribcage is not symmetrical – the ribs may be at different heights
  • One hip is more prominent than the other
  • Clothes do not hang properly
  • One shoulder, or shoulder blade, is higher than the other
  • The individual may lean to one side
  • Uneven leg lengths

Some types of scoliosis can cause back pain but it is not usually very painful. Back pain is not uncommon in older adults with long-standing scoliosis.

If scoliosis is left untreated, problems can arise later in life, such as impaired heart and lung function.

What are the Causes of Scoliosis?

  • Neuromuscular conditions: These affect the nerves and muscles and include cerebral palsy, poliomyelitis, and muscular dystrophy.
  • Congenital scoliosis (present at birth) This is rare and occurs because the bones in the spine developed abnormally when the fetus was growing inside the mother.
  • Specific genes: At least one gene is thought to be involved in scoliosis.
  • Leg length: If one leg is longer than the other, the individual may develop scoliosis.
  • Syndromic scoliosis: Scoliosis can develop as part of another disease, including neurofibromatosis and Marfan’s syndrome.
  • Osteoporosis: This can cause secondary scoliosis due to bone degeneration.
  • Other causes: Bad posture, carrying backpacks or satchels, connective tissue disorders, and some injuries.

What are the Types of Scoliosis?

There are a number of ways to differentiate between the various forms of scoliosis, but the most common method for classification is based on etiology, or the underlying cause for the condition. The American Association of Neurological Surgeons (AANS) suggests there are three categories into which the different forms of scoliosis fit: idiopathic, congenital, and neuromuscular.

Most types of scoliosis are idiopathic, which means that the cause is unknown or that there is no single factor that contributes to the development of the disease.

Congenital forms of scoliosis typically result from a spinal defect present at birth, and are therefore usually detected at an earlier age than idiopathic forms of scoliosis.

Neuromuscular scoliosis is spinal curvature that develops secondary to some kind of neurological or muscular disease, such as muscular dystrophy or cerebral palsy. This form of scoliosis tends to progress much more quickly than others.

What is the Treatment for Scoliosis?

As a Chiropractic Physician, I will do a physical examination, postural analysis, and take x-rays. I design an individualized treatment plan that will focus on pain management and postural fixation. Spinal manipulation, therapeutic exercises, and other treatments may also come into play. Initial treatment usually lasts 4-8 weeks and I then recommend my patients to follow up every 1-2 months to monitor the curve of the spine in clinic.

The following factors will be considered by the doctor when deciding on treatment options:

  • Sex: Females are more likely than males to have scoliosis that gradually gets worse.
  • Severity of the curve: The larger the curve, the greater the risk of it worsening over time. S-shaped curves, also called “double curves,” tend to worsen over time. C-shaped curves are less likely to worsen.
  • Curve position: A curve that is located in the center part of the spine is more likely to get worse compared with curves in the lower or upper section.
  • Bone maturity: The risk of worsening is lower if the person’s bones have stopped growing. Braces are more effective while bones are still growing.

What About Braces?

If the patient has moderate scoliosis and the bones are still growing, I may recommend a brace. This will prevent further curvature, but will not cure or reverse it. Braces are usually worn all the time, even at night. The more hours per day the patient wears the brace, the more effective it tends to be.

The brace does not normally restrict activities of daily living. If the patient wishes to take part in physical activity, the braces can be taken off.

When the bones stop growing, braces are no longer used. There are two types of braces:

  • Thoracolumbosacral orthosis (TLSO) – the TLSO is made of plastic and designed to fit neatly around the body’s curves. It is not usually visible under clothing.
  • Milwaukee brace – this is a full-torso brace and has a neck ring with rests for the chin and the back of the head. This type of brace is only used when the TLSO is not possible or not effective.

One study found that when bracing is used on 10-15 year olds with idiopathic scoliosis, it reduces the risk of the condition getting worse or needing surgery.

References

Nordqvist, C. (2017, December 22). Scoliosis: Treatment, symptoms, and causes. Retrieved from https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/190940.php

7 Types of Scoliosis & Their Differences [Comprehensive Guide]. (2018, December 28). Retrieved from https://www.treatingscoliosis.com/blog/scoliosis-types-differences/

I have Bursitis and Tendonitis! What is it?

I get so many patient’s that are diagnosed with bursitis and tendonitis and they have absolutely no idea what it is.  All they know is that they went to their doctor, they looked at the area of complaint for a second or two.  They saw that the patient can move the body part ok, but they had pain. The answer…BURSITIS or…..TENDONITIS.  What the heck is bursitis and tendonitis.  Lets begin by getting a definition, then we will break it down by location, the mechanism of injury and ultimately how to get rid of it (which is obviously the most important thing).

BURISITIS:

bursa

First, lets break the word down.  Burs- stands for bursa.  A bursa is a fluid-filled sac lined by a membrane.  It provides a cushion between bones and tendons and/or muscles around a joint. This helps to reduce friction between the bones and allows free movement. Bursae are filled with synovial fluid and are found around most major joints of the body.  -Itis stands for inflammation.  Therefore, when we put it together bursitis stands for inflammation of a bursa.  The most common locations for bursitis are in the shoulder, elbow and hip. But you can also have bursitis by your knee, heel and the base of your big toe. Bursitis often occurs near joints that perform frequent repetitive motion.  If you have bursitis, the affected joint may feel achy or stiff, hurt more when you move or press on it and may look swollen or red.  A lot of my patients get bursitis from throwing a baseball or lifting something over their heads repeatedly, leaning on their elbows for long periods of time, excessive kneeling like my carpet guys or scrubbing floors like my cleaning people and my patients that sit for long periods of time, especially on hard surfaces.  Does this remind you of someone?

TENDONITIS or TENDINITIS

tendon

Again, lets break it down.  Tendon-stands for a thick elastic band that attaches the muscle to a bone.  -Itis again is inflammation.  So putting it together means inflammation of a tendon.  Sometimes the tendons become inflamed for a variety of reasons, and the action of pulling the muscle becomes irritating.  If the normal smooth gliding motion of your tendon is impaired, the tendon will become inflamed and movement will become painful.  There are too many causes for tendonitis to even list.  Anything that you do can case tendonitis if the right mechanisms are there.  Unlike bursae which are not located all over the body, every muscle has a tendon so tendonitis can occur anywhere.  The most common sites are at the base of the thumb, elbow, shoulder, hip, knee and achilles tendon.

 

 

So I have Bursitis and/or Tendonitis, what do I do?  Usually by the time my patients get to me they have tried a long period of “wait and see”.  I usually tell people to avoid the “wait and see” mentality all together.  I know its tough these days, when you look everything up on the internet and it says that most things will go away on its own.  Although, this may be true sometimes, it is definitely not true all the time.  My philosophy is that if your body can handle it, your body won’t even let you know you have something wrong.  By the time your body gives you conscious awareness of a problem (a symptom) for example pain, swelling, redness, spasm, fever it should be looked at by a professional.  Again, most things are not severe, but what if there is something severe going on and you don’t have it checked by a professional, now we have a problem.  The worst thing that can happen with a non-serious condition is that your doctor sends you home and tells you that there is nothing wrong.  However, when you don’t go to a professional and there is something serious going on, the worse case scenario can be very severe. (just my two cents!!!).  Back to the treatment.  The first thing anyone wants to do when they have bursitis/tendonitis is stop the activity that caused it from happening.  Continued irritation will only make the condition worse.  If you are throwing you need to stop throwing, if you are kneeling you need to stop kneeling.  A lot of times just eliminating the mechanism of injury will heal the problem.  Another modality to use is ice.  If you look back into my heat vs. ice blog you can learn more about the benefits of ice.  Anti-inlammatories are helpful for these conditions as well because as we said -itis is inflammation so taking an anti-inflammatory will help reduce the inflammation and help with the overall pain.  I tell all my -itis patients that if you got it once you may be prone to getting it again so strengthening is usually very helpful to prevent further episodes.  There are a few cases that do not respond to general therapies like a just listed so more aggressive or advance therapies are available.  In my office we offer a class IV 15 watt laser therapy to heal tendonitis and bursitis.  We perform techniques like Active Release Technique (A.R.T.) and Graston technique.  We use Kinesio Tape and other supports to help.  Our physicians perform cortisone injections and even P.R.P. injections for the very advanced cases.  This is not the only way to treat it but a very effective combination is usually very successful with my patients.  If treated properly a full recovery is expected and when done correctly therapy prevents the prevalence of further episodes as well.

Don’t Let The Light Fluffy Snow Fool You While Shoveling! Tips To Not Injure Your Back:

Shoveling Snow, low back pain, injury, herniated disc, sprain, strain

   Even know the snow looks light and fluffy out there, don’t let that fool you when shoveling.  Sometimes it is not the weight of the snow so much as the repetitive movements of shoveling.  This light, fluffy snow is better than the heavy, wet snow, but it can still cause injury.  Here are a few tips to help prevent an injury:

1.  Take your time – if you are anything like me you want to complete the job ask quickly as possible.  However, in the case of shoveling snow, this is a recipe for disaster.  The key is to take your time, slow and steady wins the race (winning is not injuring your back).

2. Take breaks frequently – most people don’t realize how much energy they are expending when they are shoveling.  When you do take that break, you are usually very fatigued.  The key here is to take breaks every certain amount of minutes, for example every 5 minutes.  Set a timer on your watch or phone.  This is will allow your body to recover before you continue again.

3. Bend at the knees and hips – and lift the weight with your legs as you all know you should.  Do not use your back to lift because that is the easiest way to “blow out your back”.  The small muscles of your back were never designed for lifting and carrying, it is actually the large muscles of your hips and legs that were designed to do the heavy lifting.

4. Maintain a neutral spine – what does that mean?  Most people when they lift and carry flex their spine (rounding of the back).  This puts tremendous pressure on the spine and discs which are the cushions in between the bones of your spine.  It is the easiest way to injure your back because you are applying abnormal stress to parts of the spine which can’t handle that type of stress.  To stay in a neutral spine, you want to flatten your back or even put it in a very slight arch.  This will put the weight on the correct part of your spine and minimize your potential for injury.

5. Do not reach – the last thing you should do is try to over reach to get to an area.  This creates a “long lever” which can be harmful.  When reaching you put excess pressure with less support which can lead to injury.

6. Do not hold you breath – When you hold your breath while exerting you increase the pressure in your body, and everyone knows that we don’t work well under pressure!!!  Breathing is key for so many reasons.  It helps bring oxygen to your muscles to supply them with the energy they need to perform the tasks you are asking them to accomplish.  It also prevents from over-exertion injuries which can prevent things like light-headedness and headaches.

The most common injuries are sprains and strains of the low back, herniated discs and pinched nerves.  You can prevent these injuries by following these tips.  The cold is another reason why so many people hurt themselves while shoveling.  When your body is cold, the muscles are tight and less elastic and less flexible.  When you put stress on a cold, tight muscle it is much easier to injure.  Another way to prevent injury while shoveling is by warming up and more importantly staying warm.  Drinks lots of water to keep your body hydrated as well.  Please use these tips wen getting out there to shovel.  If you have any questions you can always contact us at the office and we can provide you with even more information to help you with an injury free winter!

Decrease Stress! No Problem… Just Breathe….. From your belly that is!

Decrease Stress! No Problem…

Just Breathe….. From your belly that is!

More and more studies are coming out about the power of breathing correctly. Due to our everyday stresses, we have a tendency to breath from our chest. This causes a decrease in oxygen to the right places and untimely increases stress to our body.  This type of chronic stress will affect your overall health and decrease your immune system.

What to do?

                                  Practice! Practice! Practice!

You can do this either sitting or standing. You will place one hand on your chest and the other hand on your belly. When you take that nice deep breath in, I want you to focus on pushing the hand that is on your belly out first. As you exhale, make sure you release all the air that you took in.  People, who take deeps breaths in but don’t let all the air out, will increase carbon dioxide in the body. Counting while you do this will be helpful. If it takes you 3 seconds to breath in, make sure you exhale for 3 seconds as well. The goal is to get to 10 seconds each way! As you are practicing this exercise you want to make sure that the only hand that is moving is the one on your belly. Try to not move the hand that is on your chest at all.

Consciously practicing your belly breath will increase oxygen through out the body, decrease stress, and increase your health!

Stress Management – Quick Strategies for Coping with Stress

The Quick Take Away:

  • Eat less sugar: sugar is an extraordinary stress-inducing food that undermines our health in countless ways.
  • Sleep more: go to bed earlier because you still have to get up at your usual time, so to get more rest – one the most effective stress relief behavior you can engage in, and it’s free and feels great.
  • Exercise more: the body’s response to exertion is categorically a must for health in general but a key strategy for melting stress
  • Say no … more often: reduce the demands on your schedule by simplynot committing to so many … things (for you, for your kids, at work).

We all do what we need to do to survive, “get by,” and in hopefully most cases, succeed.  In all of these, good, bad, or ugly, stress accumulates and adds to the load we’re already carrying through life.  Thankfully, we are surrounded with abundant information on how to productively quarantine, reduce, or ideally, dissipate the stress – the question is, have we looked into it yet?

There are none more powerful in managing stress levels than ourselves, and so we are charged with the responsibility of keeping tabs on how we are allowing stressors to affect us psychologically and ultimately, physically.  We understand a few of the physiological effects of chronic stress, and are tasked with finding practical methods to incorporate daily to prevent stress-induced deficiency.

Here are some great “weapons” in our arsenal that everyone can use to combat chronic stress:

  • Get Enough Sleep (usually at least 8 hours)
  • Exercise (doesn’t need to be much, at least 20 minutes a day, 3 days a week)
  • Drink water (you should never feel thirsty, if you are thirsty you need to drink more water)
  • Eat a well balanced diet (plenty of fruits and vegetables)
  • Get adjusted (a balanced body is a healthy body, adjustments keep the body in balance)

We need to practice removing ourselves from our everyday stressors, even if for a few seconds at a time while right in the middle of them, and we need to be on-purpose about it.

One particularly inconspicuous strategy that is fun and costs nothing is a “three second vacation.”  For three seconds, close your eyes and let your mind transport you to the most relaxing place on earth – sights, sounds, scents, everything.  Breathe it all in deeply for three seconds, and then resume your activity (extend duration and/or repeat as many times throughout the day as necessary).

On a larger scale, we challenge you to use some of the most gratifying activities you’ve come to enjoy to assist in the battle against stress.  They don’t necessarily need to cost anything (it doesn’t cost much to take a sketch pad out to draw a landscape or to get out and climb a tree…preferably your own tree), but a reasonable expense is also acceptable (a ride along the coast on a sunny day, top-down in a rented convertible, a round of golf, or a session out on the community airfield with a radio controlled airplane…however, if the expense or challenge of the mechanism adds stress, please find another coping mechanism to use).

We’re all different and there’s no sense in stressing about choosing coping mechanisms, so find your fun and you’ll discover a mechanism that works for you!

Full, Bloating, Turkey Overload? Here are a few great ways to lose weight after the Holidays!!!!!

1. DRINK WATER: Drinking water, especially seltzer water, helps you feel full. People often mistake thirst for hunger, so squeeze a little lemon or add your favorite fruit and drink drink drink.

2. EAT MORE OFTEN: you should be eating at least 5 meals a day. It keeps and even speeds up your metabolism. Digestion itself burns calories and eating smalls meals through out the day boosts your energy and can improve your mood.

3. ADD SOME SPICE: Making your food a little spicier can not only help curb your appetite but it can speed up your metabolism. Put some salsa on your eggs or chicken, and sprinkle a little cayenne pepper on your meals. It can really help heat/speed things up!

4. SET REALISTIC GOALS: One of the top things I continually tell my patients is to set a goal that is easily attainable. I like to follow the 80/20 rule. 80% of the time I am eating healthy through out the week and I set aside 20% to have a little fun. Using this goal makes it easier to get to your target weight with out giving up all the fun.

5. KNOW HOW TO MEASURE: Portion size is very important. We have a tendency to overeat, even if we are making the right food choices. Get out the measuring cups and spoons, even get a food scale. When measuring your food regularly, you will find that you are more satisfied with a little less.

 

THE FIRST SNOW IS UPON US, SO HERE ARE A FEW TIPS:

 

Now that the snow is obviously here, I want to make sure you protect yourselves from getting hurt.  

A recent poll points to snow shoveling as the leading cause of back and neck pain during the winter months. “Chiropractors are finding that some patients experience back and neck pain as a result of improper snow shoveling technique,” said Dr. Dennis Mizel, President of the Ontario Chiropractic Association. “Improper technique can be anything from bending at the waist instead of the knees to throwing snow instead of pushing it. When you combine improper technique with the average weight of one shovelful of snow (five to seven pounds) it becomes even more evident that this is a serious problem for both adults and the children who help them.”

We find at The Spine and Health Center of Montvale that back problems always surface in patients during the winter, especially those who are not used to participating in challenging physical activity on a regular basis.  Activities that require exertion that is more than someones normal daily routine like as winter sports or pushing stuck cars can cause back injuries. However, snow shoveling is the number one reason patients present with back pain in the winter.

 

Don’t let winter be a pain in the back – ‘Lift light, shovel right.’ Here are a few things to help prevent you from getting hurt:

1. Warm-up. Before beginning any snow removal, warm-up for five to ten minutes to get the joints moving and increase blood circulation. A good warm-up should include stretches for the back, shoulders, arms and legs. This will ensure that your body is ready for action.

2. Don’t let the snow pile up. Removing small amounts of snow on a frequent basis is less strenuous in the long run.

3. Pick the right shovel. Use a lightweight push-style shovel. If you use a metal shovel, spray it with Teflon first so snow won’t stick.

4. Push, don’t throw. Push the snow to one side and avoid throwing it as much as possible. If you have to throw, avoid twisting and turning – position yourself to throw straight at the snow pile.

5. Bend your knees. Use your knees, leg and arm muscles to do the pushing and lifting while keeping your back straight.

6. Take a break. If you feel tired or short of breath, stop and take a rest. Stop shoveling immediately if you feel chest or back pain.

Fighting Inflammation

This is another great post from my friends at Bonfire Health about inflammation:

We tend to think of inflammation in terms of injuries such as a sprained ankle or a bug bite – those are what are described as ‘acute inflammation’. There’s a much more insidious and dangerous type of inflammation – chronic low grade or ‘silent’ inflammation caused by our lifestyle choices.

S.A.D. DIET AND INFLAMMATION

By now nearly everyone’s heard of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids, but most people don’t know the first thing about what they mean. If a person eats the Standard American Diet (S.A.D.), consisting of packaged processed food that is dominated by wheat flour, vegetable oils and sugars (think cereals, bread, pasta, pizza and all prepared snack foods), they are loading their bodies with omega-6 fats which promote inflammation which causes disease (cancer, heart disease, diabetes, obesity, autoimmune). If on the other hand, a person eats lots of organic vegetables, healthy fats, and quality organic proteins (grass fed beef, organic chicken, pastured pork, etc.), they provide a healthy supply of omega-3 fats which inhibit inflammation and promote health.

11 TIPS TO BETTER POSTURE

Here are some tips I provide to patient’s to take home with them after their Chiropractic, Physical Therapy, Acupuncture or Massage Treatments:
1. Be brutally honest about your posture. You may think it’s pretty good, but if you are having neck-and-shoulder pain, headaches, issues with arms and hands, or if a bump is forming at the base of your neck, something needs to change. Breathing problems could even be related to curled-in chests. Don’t blame it on your bed or your genetics; you didn’t inherit a bad posture gene, you inherited the habit. The pain is there to show us where our body needs attention and maintenance. Listen to it and use it.  It’s impossible to be completely honest about how your posture looks just by seeing yourself in a mirror. Each of us subconsciously adjusts our posture when we look in the mirror. To be truly honest about our posture, we need to accidentally see a side view of ourselves in a window or reflective surface of some kind as we’re walking by. That is where you’ll see the real truth.
2. Stop thinking about your shoulders. Change your focus. Instead of concentrating on your shoulders, work on keeping your chest up and open. Your body will look better, function better and be more comfortable in the long run. You may even be able to breathe and digest food better.
Make sure to pop your chest up, not out. Visualize a string attached to the top of your sternum, pulling it up, and another string on the top of your head. Use your abs to help. When doing this, be careful not to create a curve in your low back.
3. Activate your abs. Use your core to help keep your chest up and open while allowing your arms and shoulders to simply relax back to where they’re supposed to be. This exercise is ideal to practice while sitting at a computer, and it helps keep you from curling in. It’s also effective while moving and working out. If you are doing any type of upper-body lifting in your workout, make sure your abs are tight and your chest is up as high as possible. If you don’t, you will work incorrect muscles and make your neck and shoulders worse.
4. Stretch your pecs and arms. Stretch your arms in every direction: up, down, out, across the body, above your head. Do what feels good.
5. Arm circles. This is a simple exercise to help with neck-and-shoulder tension. Arm circles stretch and work the muscles at the same time. Make sure you activate your abs and get your chest up as high as you can, first. Use your thumbs. If you point them like your hitchhiking while you do your circles, it helps keep your arms straight for a better stretch.
6. Shake it out. Unless the pain you’re having is related to an actual injury, the worst thing you can do is protect or baby it. Unless the muscle is torn or has received some sort of impact, the only thing to blame is our subconscious holding habits and repetitive actions. I realize when we first feel pain in the shoulders, arms and hands, our first instinct is to protect it and stabilize it. It hurts because it’s stuck, and it’s no longer receiving the flow that it needs.  Start shaking gently, then build up to shaking them as hard as you can, for as long as you can. Then stretch. Don’t wait until you have time to do yoga or an extended stretching session. If it’s stuck or sore, shake it out, move it, stretch it right then and there.
7. Turn your hands up while you run, or slightly forward while you walk. It pops your chest up and open. When you do any sort of extended walk, jog or run, pay attention to your form and moving correctly, rather than how far you go. While you’re moving is the best time to work on posture, form and body mechanics. If we change our patterns while we move, our muscles retrain themselves much faster.
8. Define posture. The definition of great posture is, getting out of our own way, leaning back, relaxing and letting our skeleton do its job. It’s about only using the muscles that are necessary for each movement we perform.
9. Pay attention to low-back pain. Believe it or not, low-back pain is usually caused by tension in the hips, glutes and upper legs. First, stop locking your legs together. Stretch your legs in every direction you can. This includes quads, hamstrings, iliotibial bands—everything that attaches in the hips. Muscles stretch better if you warm them up with shaking first.
10. How do you walk? Another contributor to low-back pain relates to how our feet hit the ground when we walk. Most of us turn our feet too far out when we walk; some people turn too far in, but it’s less common. Either way, most of us also walk or run while putting all of our weight on the outer (lateral) edge of our feet. When we do this every day, the musculature on the outside of our legs becomes overdeveloped and creates a huge pull on our sacrum, causing low-back curvature and pain.
Work on lengthening and strengthening your inner (medial) leg muscles. Every time your feet hit the ground, the entire palm of your foot should touch. Think about keeping your feet straight and putting your weight more in the middle, or core. If you do this, you will see a difference in the musculature of your legs, as well as experience less low-back pain.
11. Keep your hip joint straight and get your belly weight off of your hips. It’s important when you do this to not lock your knees. Visualize pulling the front of your body straight up from the arches of your feet to your sternum. In traditional Chinese medicine, it is taught that yin (feminine) energy runs up the front of the body, while yang (masculine) energy runs down the back of your body. Visualize your body moving up in the front of the body with each inhale, and down the back of the body with each exhale.

“Paint’s Not Dry Yet…”

You’re a few weeks into your Chiropractic care and you’re starting to feel better. You want to get back to your routine as soon as possible. There’s a ton to do around the house, you’ve got a family to take care of and you can’t wait to get back to the gym. You have an urgency to start ‘living’ again. Problem is… the paint’s not quite dry yet.

It’s not uncommon to feel ‘done’ after a few adjustments. When the innate recuperative abilities of your body kick in, you might look and feel remarkably new – like a fresh coat of paint. But like a fresh coat of paint, looks can be deceiving. What seems completely dry (healed) on the surface may still have a few tacky areas underneath. If you jump the gun and try to re-hang the fixtures, you might ruin the finish and need to start all over again.

Complete and thorough healing requires time. Even though you may feel like your old self after a few Chi- ropractic sessions, it’s no green light to go back to your old activities. The stabilizing phase of care (where you feel so good you wonder why you’re still coming in) is where all the ‘paint curing’ happens. Give your body the time it needs to completely dry and you’ll be happier with the end results.