15% OFF Normatec Recovery Boot Session!

Black Friday Discounts are in! Treat yourself or loved one this holiday season with one of our amazing Black Friday Discounts! It’s for a limited time only so hurry in to claim your discount today. Present this coupon to the front desk to claim your discount.

*Medicare restrictions apply*

*All sessions must be paid for by 4pm on BLACK FRIDAY (11/23/18)*

*Valid through 1/31/2019*

Shoulder Pain From Computer Use? Chiropractic Solution.

A Chiropractic Solution for Mouse Shoulder

BY HOWARD PETTERSSON, DC AND J.R. GREEN, DC

Dynamic Chiropractic – October 1, 2018, Vol. 36, Issue 10

Clinical literature abounds with articles about repetitive injury and conditions related to the use of electronic devices, especially stationary or desktop computers and work stations. One of these conditions that frequently brings patients to the chiropractic clinical practice has been called “mouse shoulder.” Here’s how to identify and resolve this all-too-common condition.

British osteopath Jane O’Connor gives us a succinct description of the etiology of mouse shoulder, pointing out: “The shoulder and shoulder blade attach to the body by various muscles that insert into the spine, ribcage, neck and base of the skull.

Holding a mouse … causes these muscles to contract to support the weight of the arm.”1 Dr. O’Connor also notes that repetitive strain can cause shoulder pain and weakness to the mouse user; and that similar injury may accompany other repetitive work-related tasks, such as operating machinery.

Ranasinghe, et al., observe that “complaints of arm, neck and/or shoulders (CANS) affect millions of office workers.”2 They further differentiate the complaints by noting they are “not caused by acute trauma or by any systemic disease.” The costs of CANS are astronomical. As the “leading cause of occupational illness in the United States,” Bongers, et al., estimate that work-related neck and upper-limb problems cost industry “$45 to $54 billion annually.”3

Signs and Symptoms

The patient with mouse shoulder tends to have a readily recognizable pattern of presenting complaints. They report fairly diffuse shoulder pain with focal interscapular point tenderness, and generalized myalgia over the upper trapezius. There may also be tenderness to digital pressure at the head of the glenohumeral joint and on the lateral humerus at the deltoid tubercle. Many patients recognize the underlying cause of their complaint to be associated with use of computers and other devices.

mouse shoulder - Copyright – Stock Photo / Register MarkCommon examination findings reveal taut and tender fibers in the shoulder and related muscles including the supraspinatus, deltoid, levator scapulae and upper trapezius. Deep palpation in the interscapular region on the side of shoulder involvement almost invariably shows tightness of deep paraspinal muscles such as the rhomboids.

Point tenderness is frequently encountered along the medial border of the scapula, as well as along the costovertebral junction of the upper thoracic spine. Rib humping and prominent interscapular soft-tissue bunching can be readily detected in most cases. A positive shoulder depressor finding often manifests on the side of shoulder involvement from chronic tightness in the upper trapezius.

The patient with mouse shoulder may also complain of intermittent numbness or tingling in the hands and distal extremities. However, biceps deep-tendon reflexes and vibrational sensitivity are usually within normal limits. The patient may demonstrate some pain-limited range of motion while abducting and externally rotating the involved shoulder.

A negative Codman (drop-arm) test helps to eliminate the likelihood of tears and other injuries to the rotator cuff muscles – notably the supraspinatus. Be alert to patient reports of pain in the rotator cuff and deltoid region during the Codman test, because that may be indicative of chronic overuse of the shoulder muscles.

One explanation for the mouse shoulder phenomenon may be contracture of interscapular muscles, especially the rhomboids and portions of the trapezius. Because these muscles are under constant and long-term load to stabilize the shoulder as the mousing arm is working, they may become fatigued and less pliable. Consequently, when the arm is raised or moved into abduction and rotation, the shoulder muscles encounter unanticipated resistance and demonstrate stiffness and pain with motion.

Correcting Mouse Shoulder

Chiropractic intervention for an uncomplicated presentation of mouse shoulder typically involves attention to three areas of involvement:

  1. Thoracic and costovertebral segmental fixation
  2. Lower cervical segmental fixation
  3. Glenohumeral joint dysfunction involving anterior and inferior malposition of the humeral head

Adjusting procedures may use manual technique or instrument-assisted correction, or a combination of both.

Thoracic: Locate thoracic segments to be adjusted by palpating for taut and tender paraspinal fibers and prominent transverse processes on the side of involvement. These vertebral misalignments are almost always on the side of the shoulder complaint at the levels of T2-T4. To adjust an upper thoracic vertebra, take a scissors stance on the side of involvement. For a manual correction, use a single-hand contact with the fleshy pisiform of the inferior hand. Stabilize by placing the palm of the superior hand over the dorsum of the contact hand. Apply a posterior to anterior and slightly superior and medial thrust to the high transverse. For an instrument-assisted correction, contact the prominent transverse and apply a thrust with an anterior, medial and slightly superior line of drive.

Costovertebral: When a costovertebral articulation misalignment is present with a complaint of mouse shoulder – and it frequently will be – contact the rib manually or with the instrument, about a centimeter lateral to the transverse process. Apply an anterior and slightly lateral thrust to the rib. A manual thrust may also include a torque component (clockwise on the right, counterclockwise on the left) to facilitate release of the rib fixation. Release of the rib at the costotransverse articulation often produces immediate abatement of some of the symptoms associated with the mouse shoulder complaint.

Lower Cervical: Segmental fixation of a lower cervical vertebra – usually C7 or C5 – is frequently encountered with mouse shoulder. Use a conventional manual or instrument-assisted adjusting procedure to correct cervical segmental fixation.

Glenohumeral: Manual and instrument-assisted correction of the glenohumeral joint component of mouse shoulder usually involves a posterior and slightly superior thrust to the head of the humerus. One strategy for manual adjusting is to take a scissors stance at about the level of the patient’s elbow. Use the inferior hand to take a broad stabilizing contact over the scapula. Reach under the shoulder and contact the exposed head of the humerus with a stabilized middle finger of the superior hand. Apply an anterior and superior thrust to the scapula with the inferior hand, while simultaneously using the superior hand to apply a posterior and superior thrust to the humerus.

This method tends to work most effectively using a table with a drop mechanism. To correct the glenohumeral joint with an instrument, reach over and retract the shoulder with the inferior hand. Apply a posterior and superior thrust to the exposed head of the humerus.

References

  1. “10 Ways to Fix Your Mouse Shoulder Pain, Now.” PainDoctor.com, Aug. 14, 2017.
  2. Ranasinghe P, et al. Work-related complaints of arm, neck and shoulder among computer workers in an Asian country: prevalence and validation of a risk-factor questionnaire. BMC Musculoskel Disord,2011;12:68.
  3. Bongers PM, et al. Epidemiology of work related neck and upper limb problems: psychosocial and personal risk factors (part 1) and effective interventions from a bio behavioural perspective (part 2). J Occup Rehabil, 2006;16:279-302.

Dr. Howard Pettersson, a 1976 graduate of Logan College of Chiropractic, is an associate professor of technique at Palmer College of Chiropractic. He was the senior editor of Activator Methods Chiropractic Technique – College Edition, published in 1989, and published Pelvic Drop Table Adjusting Technique in 1999. His most recent publication, written with Dr. Green, is How to Find a Subluxation, published in 2003.

Dr. J.R. Green is a 1988 Graduate of Palmer College of Chiropractic. He retired from the Palmer faculty after many years of teaching basic sciences and chiropractic technique. He is currently in private practice in Galva, Ill., and is also an adjunct professor of chemistry with the Eastern Iowa Community College District. Dr. Green was one of the writers of Activator Methods Chiropractic Technique (1997) and also worked as a technical writing consultant on Activator Methods Chiropractic Technique – College Edition and Pelvic Drop Table Adjusting Technique.

 

 

https://www.dynamicchiropractic.com/mpacms/dc/article.php?id=58266

Exercise of the Month – February

February’s exercise of the month is a modified plank which involves a stability ball . It is a tremendous core strength and stability builder. Check it out!

Our Physical Therapists

Keri Moran, PT
Bruce Buckman PT, DPT, ART

Our Physical Therapy Services

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DISCLAIMER: NOTHING AVAILABLE THROUGH OR ON THIS WEBSITE SHOULD BE CONSTRUED AS MEDICAL ADVICE. OUR WEBSITE DOES NOT OFFER MEDICAL DIAGNOSES OR PATIENT-SPECIFIC TREATMENT ADVICE. IT IS IMPORTANT THAT YOU CONSULT WITH YOUR HEALTHCARE PROFESSIONAL ABOUT ANY CONDITION YOU MAY HAVE. YOU SHOULD ALWAYS CONSULT WITH YOUR DOCTOR BEFORE BEGINNING ANY EXERCISES OR EXERCISE ROUTINE. DO NOT DISREGARD PROFESSIONAL MEDICAL ADVICE, OR DELAY SEEKING IT BECAUSE OF SOMETHING YOU HAVE READ IN OR ON THIS SITE.

© The Spine and Health Center of Montvale 2016

2 South Kinderkamack Road, Suite 200, Montvale, NJ 07645


Neck Pain | Cervical Disc Herniation and Pinched Nerves!

What the Neck Pain?

If you have neck pain related to cervical disc herniation or stenosis as it relates to your c3-c4, c4-c5 and c5-c6, then you should read the following:

We see many patients who complain about neck pain, stiffness in muscles such as shoulders, arms and biceps who don’t even realize they may have herniated their cervical discs.

Below you will find common questions and answers about Cervical Disc Herniations. We also discuss basic treatment styles for such herniations and explain how they work.

 

What is a disc herniation of the cervical spine?
Literally, a disc herniation is when the nucleus pulposis of a disc migrates out through the annular fibrosis into the outer portion of a spinal disc.  What the heck does that mean?  Picture it this way.  A disc is like a jelly donut, it is made up of 2 parts.  The center is the jelly (nucleus pulposis) and it is supposed to stay in the center.  It is surrounded by the donut (annulus fibrosis).  Unlike a donut, there is no hole in the disc to inject the jelly into so there are really no weak points for the jelly to come out.

There are so many different ways an intervertebral spinal disc can herniate.  I see a lot of patients that get into car accidents (what doctors call MVA’s or motor vehicle accidents).  When you suffer a whiplash injury, when your head gets violently whipped back and forth, that is one way a disc can herniate.  Sports injuries, slips and falls, or even abnormal wear and tear.  If the body is out of alignment and one side rubs more than the other it can lead to an area getting weak and that can cause a disc to herniate.  In my practice, I see a lot of people with bad posture that have sustained herniated discs.  Repetitive stress injuries, overuse syndromes and a whole lot of other issues can also cause intervertebral discs to herniate, but I think you get my point.

Before, we list the symptoms, we should explain why you get symptoms.  First, when you herniate a disc that means there has been soft tissue damage.  That damage causes a response in the body that includes inflammation, muscle spasms and pain.  Now that combination of symptoms you can tag to any type of soft tissue damage including; sprained ankles, black and blues, shoulder injuries, even cuts and bruises.  I think everyone knows what happens when they stub their toes.  That is your body’s response to injury and damage.  It is your defense mechanism and you don’t have to think about doing it because it happens automatically.  With herniated discs, though, it doesn’t stop there.  The jelly (nucleus pulpous) creeps out of the disc and goes into the part of the spine that the spinal cord and spinal nerves go through.  That’s where the real problems begin.  Sometimes the herniation is large enough where the jelly pushes right onto the spinal cord or the spinal nerves that go through the area of the spine that the disc herniates from.  When you “pinch” a nerve like that you get a whole other list of symptoms due to the injury to the nerve.  These can include; pain, numbness and tingling, burning, weakness, loss of sensation, loss of muscle strength, loss of muscle mass (atrophy) and even paralysis.  We all know what happened to Christopher Reeves when he injured his spinal cord and that is no good.

At The Spine and Health Center of Montvale and The Spine and Health Center of Jersey City, we have had tremendous success helping patients with herniated discs.  We have a large population of our patient’s that have suffered herniated intervertebral discs in their cervical spines (necks) and lumbar spines (low backs).  At our office we have combined the latest advances in physical medicine to help treat, not only the symptoms associated with herniations, but the discs themselves.  We officer services ranging from Chiropractic, Physical Therapy,  Massage to more technological modalities like Laser, Decompression, Active Therapeutic Movements (ATM’s), etc.

I hope this will answer some of your questions about herniated discs. If there is anything more I can help you with, don’t hesitate to call The Spine and Health Center of Montvale.  Our phone number is 201-746-6577 or email us at info@thespineandhealthcenter.com.

Dr. Peter Wohl, DC, ART, BCIM


Our Locations – Montvale, NJ and Jersey City, NJ

The Spine and Health Center of Montvale – Chiropractic and Physical Therapy

The Spine and Health Center of Jersey City – Chiropractic and Physical Therapy

Regional Interdependence: Effects on the Tibiofemoral (Knee) Joint

by Dr. Bruce Buckman PT, DPT, ART


Regional interdependence is the concept that “seemingly unrelated impairments in remote anatomical regions of the body may contribute to and be associated with a patient’s primary report of symptoms.” The majority of the literature surrounding regional interdependence in the lower extremity has been focused on low back pain, which has been positively correlated to hip osteoarthritis, decreased strength, neuromuscular control, range of motion, and mobility of the lower extremity. Relationships between the foot, ankle, and the low back have also been reported. The examples of regional interdependence are endless, some more obscure than others, but let’s break down a simple one that may not be all that “seemingly unrelated.” This example is one that I see in many, if not all of my elementary school and high school athletes.

Regional Interdependence and Tibiofemoral (Knee) Pain

The knee, for many young athletes, becomes a problem in sports that involve running, jumping, lunging, and lateral change of direction. Trying to think of a sport that doesn’t involve these movements? Keep thinking… Keep thinking… Exactly. The knee often gets a bad reputation and is the source of a lot of unnecessary force during these aforementioned activities, while in reality your hips and feet are most likely significant contributing factors to your knee pain. So how can your foot and hip be contributing to your knee pain?

The Foot’s Role In Knee Pain

Pes planus, or simply put, having flat feet (Figure 1) is a term that describes an observation in static postures. When moving, your foot may fall into pronation. Pronation is actually a normal part of the gait cycle. In fact, foot pronation is necessary to soften the blow and absorb contact from ground reaction forces when walking.

Figure 1. Foot Pronation

foot physical therapy

“Over/excessive pronation” is the correctly used terminology that describes the medial longitudinal arch (Figure 2) collapsing towards the ground. Now, how does over-pronation tie into the concept of regional interdependence? Simply put…it starts from the ground up. When the foot makes contact with the ground and overly pronates, increased stress is placed on the medial (inside) aspect of the lower extremity. This medial stress travels up the kinetic chain to the next closest joint (the knee) causing a valgus moment as well as medial tibial rotation (Figure 3). In static standing, valgus knee stress is not a huge issue, but place the knee under significant load with activities such as running, jumping, lunging, and lateral change of direction activities and this stress can cause dysfunction leading to muscle strains, ligament sprains, and capsular restrictions. Know someone who has had an ACL/PCL injury? Consider this… The ACL and the PCL twist around one another forming an “X” pattern. Both the ACL and PCL become taught with medial tibial rotation and subsequent lateral (outside) femoral rotation (Figure 3). Continuing on, the femur (leg bone above the knee) becomes adducted and medially rotated placing stress on the acetabular femoral joint leading to more potential muscle strains and hip labrum pathology. This stress finally makes its way to the sacroiliac joint and lumbar spine.

Figure 2. Medial Longitudinal Arch

physical therapy plantar fascia

 

 

 

 

 

 

Figure 3. Kinetic Chain Breakdown

hip knee physical therapy

 

 

 

 

 

 

Figure 4. ACL/PCL

acl pcl physical therapy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Hip’s Role In Knee Pain

Aside from anatomical variables such as femoral anteversion (twisting in of the thigh bone at the femoral head) and femoral retroversion, (twisting out of the thigh bone at the femoral head) most of the dysfunction that occurs at the hip is muscular when relating the hip to knee pain. The hip abductors (gluteus medius and tensor fascia latae) along with the gluteus maximus and external rotators pull the hip away from the body in an open kinetic chain position (feet off the floor) such as in sitting. However, when in standing, the activation of these muscles pull the knee outward, away from midline and prevent dynamic genu valgus (Figure 5). In single limb stance, the lack of activation of these muscles causes Trendelenburg’s hip drop, which has been associated with Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome. In fact, subjects with Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome (PFPS) also display 18% less hip abduction and 17% less hip external rotation strength. Muscles such as the Vastus Medialis Oblique (VMO) often take blame for being weak, or under activated in patients with PFPS; however, research has denied this muscle’s ability to be isolated with EMG studies. While the VMO anatomically assists in the “tracking” of the patella, a more regional approach involving strengthening the hip musculature may influence knee mechanics to a greater degree. The biceps femoris (hamstring), rectus femoris (quadriceps) and Illiotibial band (abductor) influence the knee in a more direct way by crossing both the hip and knee joint, directly affecting the knee during functional movement patterns. What does this all do to the knee? Besides the rotary forces I explained above, this valgus stress collapses the lateral knee capsule and puts a significant amount of tensile strength on the medial knee joint deeming it susceptible for ligamentous/cartilaginous (MCL, ACL, PCL, meniscus), tendinous (pes anserine) and capsule injury.

Figure 5. Dynamic Genu Valgus

knee physical therapy

Conclusion

Using regional interdependence, clinicians can effectively evaluate and treat the body as whole rather than specific joints, which may lead to incorrect diagnoses of associated musculoskeletal disorders. Joints above and below your primary impairment may be contributing factors, and if not addressed, could lead to the re-occurrence of chronic injury. Call us at The Spine and Health Center of Montvale at 201-746-6577 for a physical therapy regional interdependence evaluation today!

 

References

Sueki et al. A regional interdependence model of musculoskeletal dysfunction: research, mechanisms, and clinical implications. J Man Manip Ther. 2013 May; 21(2): 90–102.

Nakasagawa et al. Trunk, pelvis, hip and knee kinematics, hip strength and gluteal muscle activation during a single-leg squat in males and females with and without patellofemoral pain syndrome. Journal of Sports Physical Therapy. 2012 June; 42(6).

 

Exercise of the Week #24 – Improving Squat Mechanics

Check out this week’s Exercise of the Week in which Dr. Bruce Buckman PT, DPT assesses an overhead squat and shows corrective exercises to address specific deficiencies. Dr. Buckman also received his certification in Lower Extremity Active Release Techniques this weekend. Congratulations Bruce!

Our Physical Therapists

Keri Moran, PT
Bruce Buckman, PT, DPT

Our Physical Therapy Services

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DISCLAIMER: NOTHING AVAILABLE THROUGH OR ON THIS WEBSITE SHOULD BE CONSTRUED AS MEDICAL ADVICE. OUR WEBSITE DOES NOT OFFER MEDICAL DIAGNOSES OR PATIENT-SPECIFIC TREATMENT ADVICE. IT IS IMPORTANT THAT YOU CONSULT WITH YOUR HEALTHCARE PROFESSIONAL ABOUT ANY CONDITION YOU MAY HAVE. YOU SHOULD ALWAYS CONSULT WITH YOUR DOCTOR BEFORE BEGINNING ANY EXERCISES OR EXERCISE ROUTINE. DO NOT DISREGARD PROFESSIONAL MEDICAL ADVICE, OR DELAY SEEKING IT BECAUSE OF SOMETHING YOU HAVE READ IN OR ON THIS SITE.

© The Spine and Health Center of Montvale 2016

2 South Kinderkamack Road, Suite 200, Montvale, NJ 07645



Exercise of the Week #17 – Thoracic Spine Extension

Check out this week’s Exercise of the Week –  Thoracic Spine Extensions over a foam roller. This is a great exercise for improving thoracic spine mobility. Featured in the video is our first student, Charlie, who is doing his clinical rotation from Sacred Heart University. We are very excited to have him on board for the next 10 weeks as part of our team!

Our Physical Therapists

Keri Moran, PT
Bruce Buckman, PT, DPT

Our Physical Therapy Services

Our Chiropractor Services


DISCLAIMER: NOTHING AVAILABLE THROUGH OR ON THIS WEBSITE SHOULD BE CONSTRUED AS MEDICAL ADVICE. OUR WEBSITE DOES NOT OFFER MEDICAL DIAGNOSES OR PATIENT-SPECIFIC TREATMENT ADVICE. IT IS IMPORTANT THAT YOU CONSULT WITH YOUR HEALTHCARE PROFESSIONAL ABOUT ANY CONDITION YOU MAY HAVE. YOU SHOULD ALWAYS CONSULT WITH YOUR DOCTOR BEFORE BEGINNING ANY EXERCISES OR EXERCISE ROUTINE. DO NOT DISREGARD PROFESSIONAL MEDICAL ADVICE, OR DELAY SEEKING IT BECAUSE OF SOMETHING YOU HAVE READ IN OR ON THIS SITE.

© The Spine and Health Center of Montvale 2016



Concussions – Part II

Recognizing a Concussion

by Dr. Bruce Buckman PT, DPT

It is important for on the field recognition of signs and symptoms of concussions. These  symptoms include signs that can be observed by an athlete’s coach or athletic trainer can include but are not limited to:

  • Appearing dazed or stunned
  • Confused about aspects of game/practice
  • Forgets instructions
  • Being unsure of score or opposition
  • Appearing clumsy
  • Answering questions slowly
  • Losing consciousness
  • Change in personality
  • Inability to recall events prior to trauma
  • Inability to recall events post trauma

Off the field, the use of pre-concussion baseline testing is just as important, and in some respect even more so in considering an athletes return to prior level of function. Computerized tests such as the ImPACT (Immediate Post-Concussion Assessment and Cognitive Testing) are scientifically valid and reliable in determining such measures. Less mainstream, the Biodex Balance system can also be used as a more clinical oriented pre-concussive test. After an athlete exhibits signs of a concussion, these post-tests can track an athlete’s progress through a post-concussion rehab protocol.

What to Do After a Concussion is Sustained?

There are medical doctors who specialize in providing care specifically to patients who have sustained an insult to the brain, directly or indirectly through contact; however, it is not a necessity to see one of these specialists prior to seeking assessment by one of our doctors. Our physical therapists/chiropractic physicians perform a comprehensive evaluation of patients to assess musculoskeletal and vestibular functioning, as well as concussion related symptoms such as headache, nausea and/or vomiting. If a referral to a medical doctor is necessary, we can assist you in finding and scheduling an appointment. These specialists will coordinate care with your physical therapist and/or chiropractor in order to ensure the safest and quickest recovery and return to sport.

Post-Concussion Return to Play

The most important first step in post concussion management is cognitive rest until post-concussive symptoms resolve. This period of complete physical and cognitive rest may take days, weeks or even months. Before the initiation of physical therapy or chiropractic care, a symptom checklist should be reviewed with the patient and parents/guardians to ensure that the athlete has been asymptomatic for at least 24 hours. If the athlete experiences symptoms while in physical therapy or chiropractic care, the session should be terminated. The patient should have entire day off (of rest) before symptom checklist is re-assessed. If the patient scores a “zero” then that would mean a return to the previous stage. If asymptomatic for 24 hours, the patient may progress to the next stage at the following session. Typical sessions of physical therapy will last 30-50 minutes depending on the progression stage; furthermore, patients should be seen five days a week with appointments scheduled at the same time to assess 24-hour symptoms. Check out the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC’s) graded return to play protocol below.

 

Rehabilitation Stage Functional Exercise at each Stage Objectives of each Stage
1. No Activity Complete physical and cognitive rest Recovery;

**Patient should have a score of zero on above checklist in order to begin physical therapy.

2. Light Aerobic Exercise Walking, swimming, or stationary bike, keeping intensity below 70% MHR, no resistance training Increase HR
3. Sport- Specific Exercise Skating drills in ice hokey, running drills in soccer, no head impact activities Add Movement
4. Non-Contact Training Drills

 

 

Progression to more complex training drills, e.g. passing drills in football; may start progressive resistance training Exercise, coordination, and cognitive load
5. Full Contact Practice Following medical clearance, participate in normal training activities Restore confidence and assess functional skills by contacting coaching staff
6. Normal Game Play

References

McCrory, P., Meeuwisse, W., Johnston, K., et al. Consensus Statement on Concussion in Sport: the 3rd International Conference on Concussion in Sport held in Zurich, November 2008. Br J Sports Med 2009;43:i76–i84.

 

Cantu, RC. Posttraumatic Retrograde and Anterograde Amnesia: Pathophysiology and Implications in Grading and Safe Return to Play. Journal of Athletic Training 2001;36(3):244–248

 

Cantu RC. Guidelines for return to contact sports after a cerebral concussion. Physician Sportsmed. 1986;14(10):75–83.

Center for Disease Control and Prevention. Heads Up: Brain Injury in Your Practice. A Tool Kit for Physicians. January 15, 2010. http://www.cdc.gov/concussion/HeadsUp/physicians_tool_kit.html.

 

Exercise of the Week #13 – Glute Bridges with Leg Curl

Check out this week’s Exercise of the Week – Glute Bridges with a Leg Curl on the physioball. This is an intermediate to advanced lower body strengthening exercise that also improves core stability. Take a look.

Our Physical Therapists
Keri Moran, PT
Bruce Buckman, PT, DPT

Our Physical Therapy Services

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DISCLAIMER: NOTHING AVAILABLE THROUGH OR ON THIS WEBSITE SHOULD BE CONSTRUED AS MEDICAL ADVICE. OUR WEBSITE DOES NOT OFFER MEDICAL DIAGNOSES OR PATIENT-SPECIFIC TREATMENT ADVICE. IT IS IMPORTANT THAT YOU CONSULT WITH YOUR HEALTHCARE PROFESSIONAL ABOUT ANY CONDITION YOU MAY HAVE. YOU SHOULD ALWAYS CONSULT WITH YOUR DOCTOR BEFORE BEGINNING ANY EXERCISES OR EXERCISE ROUTINE. DO NOT DISREGARD PROFESSIONAL MEDICAL ADVICE, OR DELAY SEEKING IT BECAUSE OF SOMETHING YOU HAVE READ IN OR ON THIS SITE.

© The Spine and Health Center of Montvale 2016


 


Exercise of the Week #12 – Scap Stability Step-Overs

Check out this week’s Exercise of the Week – Scap Stability Step-Overs. Building on last week’s Scap Stability Clocks, this exercise helps to build shoulder and scapular strength and stability.

Our Physical Therapists
Keri Moran, PT
Bruce Buckman, PT, DPT

Our Physical Therapy Services

Our Chiropractor Services


DISCLAIMER: NOTHING AVAILABLE THROUGH OR ON THIS WEBSITE SHOULD BE CONSTRUED AS MEDICAL ADVICE. OUR WEBSITE DOES NOT OFFER MEDICAL DIAGNOSES OR PATIENT-SPECIFIC TREATMENT ADVICE. IT IS IMPORTANT THAT YOU CONSULT WITH YOUR HEALTHCARE PROFESSIONAL ABOUT ANY CONDITION YOU MAY HAVE. YOU SHOULD ALWAYS CONSULT WITH YOUR DOCTOR BEFORE BEGINNING ANY EXERCISES OR EXERCISE ROUTINE. DO NOT DISREGARD PROFESSIONAL MEDICAL ADVICE, OR DELAY SEEKING IT BECAUSE OF SOMETHING YOU HAVE READ IN OR ON THIS SITE.

© The Spine and Health Center of Montvale 2016